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Author Topic: Kite Trimming
Will G Posted: 09-Apr-06 17:31
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I am finding that that the course where the kite will actually settle is minimal, and wondered if anyone could tell me where the kite should be comfortable and how to avoid the irritating and sporadic flogging of the genakker. Much Appreciated, Will-Buzz 1018
 
ifoxwell Posted: 10-Apr-06 16:08
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Hi Will

This is the sort of thing that is easier to show than to explain in words, where do you sail.

Either way I donít have a great deal of experience with the class but must say that I find the kite to be one of the Buzzís strengths. Its quite a full cut which can catch out people used to a more modern, flatter cut but it does allow the boat to fly the kite through a very large range of angles. From a tight reach right through to a very broad, almost dead run. Your typical broad reach would be the normal place to start if you where practicing.

General just over sheeting the kite momentarily and then letting the sheet back out will be enough to catch most collapses although if your on a very deep run you it can help to do the opposite, let it out for the kit to swing around the front and then sheet back in.

Either way the crew needs to keep playing the kite so that the front edge is just on the point of curling the whole time.

Its all down to practise really.

O and how old is the kite. If its really tired and baggy it may be to full and thus stalling all the time, in which case you really need to invest in a new one.

Hope this helps

Ian
 
Pete Lindley Posted: 10-Apr-06 17:07
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Will,
The way you ask the question, makes me think that you are setting the kite on the curl as is the required technique, then the crew is doing nothing else - even though the helm is altering course as necessary.

The kite has to be constantly trimmed as Ian says. Keep it on the curl. The curl occurs on the luff, about 1/3 from the top.

The crew should NOT take their eye off of the kite for any period of time - else the kite will collapse.

The other thing could be that the kite is rigged incorrectly (upside down!?)

Pete
 
Jane_Mark Buzz 847 Posted: 10-Apr-06 17:15
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If you think the reason you are having difficulties is that your kite is quite old and sticks to itself when slightly damp so that getting it to fill is a bit of a problem you may want to consider trying to reproof it. We haven't tried it but there was a long thread on this message board a while ago which may be worth exploring - Nikwax I think was favoured as a cheapish option. Has any who has tried this any comments on how successful it was??

If the kite is OK then as Ian says practise is the answer. In the end it comes down to feel and what you think works best for you. In light and marginal winds in particular the angles people favour vary considerably with some going very deep (in which case some favour furling the jib and giving windward heel to try and get as much spinnaker exposed to the wind) while some sail higher with a bit more speed. It all comes down to speed versus distance.

If you can I would suggest going to the training in May - they will certainly cover spinnaker work there.

Happy gybing
Jane and Mark
 
John Paul Indoe Posted: 10-Apr-06 21:03
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i recommend FABSIL, can be brought from millets, etc. Works well but dont do it on the lawn!. There was a big spinni outline of dead grass for a few weeks after doing it
 
ifoxwell Posted: 11-Apr-06 10:59
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Perhaps its time some one wrote a bit to upgrade the website.

Easy for me to say I guess as I havenít got a Buzz and so I couldnít easily contribute much.

But I know several of the you now have some nice rigging mods such as a take away system for the spinni sheets and halyard elastic etc. It might be good if some one could put together some pictures and rigging instructions with suggestions for common problems such as knots and twists in the halyard when hoisting dropping, what to do if you run over a kite and how to avoid it or common reasons that the kite is hard to pull up, drop etc.

Ian
 
Will G Posted: 11-Apr-06 11:30
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thankyou very much for the prompt and detailed response. I will attempt to apply all that was said and will get back to the board with the results.
 
Bob Ladell Posted: 12-Apr-06 22:34
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If anybody wants the Nikwax technique - drop me a line. It's the one thing I profess to being the expert in this game Keeps an old kite comfortably workable for another couple of years - and saves your crew's strength too !

I would only use it on an old kite that has lost *all* of it's silicone covering and is prone to being very sticky at getting back in the chute when wet.

Fabsil - does the waterproofing but not the lubrication - and smells something awful ! Not my preferred option.

The only other tip on preventing the sporadic flogging is get your crew to talk to you as near non stop as you can to tell you about the pressure. Slightest drop in pressure when at speed bear, off a couple of degrees and give the main a pull in to keep the speed up and that should also help fix the problem. As above - practice. ( I'll get it right - one day..... )

Bob
 
buzz755 Posted: 22-Aug-06 10:33
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Hi Bob,


I have two kites and one is getting a little tired, which is the one we are using for training. Could you post up a few more details on the nikwax technique please? I was going to use fabsil but if it smells I might try an alternative

Cheers,

Rich
Buzz 755
 
Bob Ladell Posted: 22-Aug-06 21:02
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OK - here goes again. Must get this added to the tweaks sections to save re-writing it.

Basic aim is to use the NikWax to lube the kite both sides. You can do the whole thing or just the areas that matter most. It makes little difference.

The areas that matter most are the halyard run from the downhaul patch to the down haul hole to make sure the halyard runs on a slippery surface - like the original silcone coating. Cover an area at least a metre either side of the halyard and the whole of the triangle the size of the foot.

Other side needs the first 2/3rds that goes in the chute making slippery again.

Technique is with a **dry** kite, spray the NikWax on about a metre square at a time and then rub in with either kitchen towel or a paint brush. The spray sits on the surface and needs moving about a fair bit to get it to penetrate the cloth surface.

Then hang it up to dry for at least 3 days in your garage before use. Any less and it will wash off.

You will need to repeat cover at 3 months, 6 months and then a year or so as the wax impregnation builds up in the fibres. 3 spray cans at around £8 each - just a tad cheaper than a new kite !!!
 
Johan 577 Posted: 14-Jan-07 15:33
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Which particular nikwax product is best?

The Tent and Gear Proof spray looks most appropriate.

http://www.nikwax.co.uk/en-gb/products/productdetail.php?productid=65
&activityid=1&itemid=3&fabricid=36

 

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